Our Feeds

Tuesday, 12 November 2019

onikewide

Health Doctor -Ways to Relieve Menstrual Cramps

Menstrual cramps, or primary dysmenorrhea, are an uncomfortable part of life for many women...


Hydrate


Drink More Water

Menstrual cramps, or primary dysmenorrhea, are an uncomfortable part of life for many women on a monthly basis. 
Drinking more water may help ease bloating, which makes symptoms worse. 
Get in the habit of drinking 6 to 8 glasses of water per day, especially during your period. Add some mint or a lemon wedge to make it more palatable. While you're at it, back off of the salt, which encourages fluid retention and bloating. Avoid alcohol, which promotes dehydration

Some women experience diarrhea or vomiting in conjunction with menstrual cramps. It's important to replace lost fluids by drinking plenty of water.

Easy Ways to Get More Fluids

If you don't like the taste of plain water, there are many things you can do to increase fluid intake. Start by drinking a glass of fruit-infused water the first thing after you get up in the morning. Sip chamomile or ginger tea. Drink flavored mineral water for a new twist on hydration. 

Make a pitcher of cucumber, mint, or lemon water to drink throughout the day for a spa-like treat. Sip a cup of low sodium broth to increase your fluid intake. Staying well hydrated isn't just good for cramps, it's good for your overall health.


Eat to Reduce Pain


Diet Is Key

You may be craving fatty, sugary, or salty foods when you have your period, but these foods are not your friends. Skip the doughnuts and potato chips. Some women find that eating the right kinds of foods may help ease menstrual pain. Anti-inflammatory foods like cherries, blueberries, squash, tomatoes, and bell peppers are good choices. Coldwater fish that is high in omega-3 fatty acids are also healthy choices. Eat more calcium-rich beans, almonds, and dark leafy greens. These foods contain compounds that combat inflammation. Some women report that eating this way can help ease menstrual pain and boost health. It's best to eat a healthy, balanced diet year round, not just for a few days a month during your period.

Avoid These

Your dietary and lifestyle habits can either help or hurt period cramps. If you experience monthly menstrual discomfort, some women find it helpful to avoid certain foods. Skip white, refined foods including sugar, bread, and pasta. Avoid trans-fatty acids that are found most often in commercially-prepared foods like French fries, cookies, onion rings, crackers, and margarine. Ditch alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine. All of these things increase inflammation and may encourage period pain. There is some evidence to show that reducing harmful fat intake may also help relieve painful periods.


Sip Chamomile Tea


Sipping chamomile tea may help reduce cramps when you menstruate. Chamomile tea is full of anti-inflammatory substances that inhibit prostaglandins. Prostaglandins are made by cells in the endometrium of the uterus. These cells release prostaglandins during a woman's period, provoking muscle contractions of the uterus, pain, and cramps. Prostaglandins in the bloodstream are responsible for nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache during the menstrual period. NSAIDs like naproxen and ibuprofen reduce prostaglandin production. Sipping chamomile tea inhibits pain-causing prostaglandins and enhances menstrual flow to ease period symptoms.


Go for Ginger


A study of young women found that ginger capsules relieved symptoms of primary dysmenorrhoea including painful periods as well as NSAIDs like ibuprofen and mefenamic acid. Women in the ginger group took 250 milligram capsules of ginger 4 times a day for the first 3 days of their periods. Women in the mefanamic acid group took 250 milligram capsules 4 times per day while those in the ibuprofen group took 400 milligrams per day 4 times per day. Women in each of the 3 treatment groups reported similar pain relief, satisfaction with treatment, and reductions in severity of dysmenorrhea regardless of which treatment they took. None of the women in the study reported severe side effects with any treatment. Try a little ginger if you'd like a drug-free alternative for period pain relief.


Fish Oil and Vitamin B1


Researchers studied the effects of vitamin B1 and fish oil on dysmenorrhea symptoms in high school students. The young women were separated into 4 different groups. One group took 100 milligrams of vitamin B1 per day. Another took 500 milligrams of fish oil per day. One group took a combination of both vitamin B1 and fish oil daily. The last group took a placebo. The women took the treatment at the beginning of their menstrual cycles and continued for 2 months. Compared to those in the placebo group, those who took vitamin B1, fish oil, or both reported significantly less pain. The women who took fish oil or B1 also reported their pain didn't last as long compared to those in the placebo group.


More Magnesium


Magnesium is an essential mineral your body needs to fuel more than 300 enzyme systems. You need it to build muscles, proteins, and healthy bones. Your body needs magnesium for the proper function of muscles and nerves, to regulate blood pressure, and control blood sugar levels. You need magnesium to build DNA and RNA and to manufacture glutathione, the master antioxidant of the body. Magnesium may also help alleviate symptoms of PMS, especially when taken with vitamin B6. One study of women found that those who took 250 milligrams of magnesium and 40 milligrams vitamin B6 per day experienced the greatest reduction in PMS symptoms. Be careful. Magnesium can interfere with the activity of certain medications including antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), diuretics, and bisphosphonates. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if magnesium is appropriate and safe for you.

More Benefits for Women

Adequate intake of magnesium is also associated with a lower risk of endometriosis. Good sources of magnesium include almonds, spinach, cashews, peanuts, and black beans. Adult women should get between 310 and 400 milligrams of magnesium per day depending on their age and whether or not they are pregnant or lactating.


Exercise


Get Moving to Relieve Symptoms

Many women find that exercising helps relieve menstrual cramps. Exercise releases endorphins, brain chemicals that promote well-being. Whether you enjoy walking, running, or swimming, it's safe to participate in all of these activities during your menstrual period. Yoga and tai chi are gentler forms of exercise that may be easier to do if you experience fatigue.


Baths Soothe Pain


Just Add Bubbles

A warm bath may be just the thing you need to soothe pain and relax tense muscles. Start by adding some luxurious bubble bath or fragrant essential oil. Read your favorite book or magazine to help melt stress and tension away. Taking a bath in the evening is a great activity to help you wind down and sleep better. If you're not a bath person, a warm shower can produce similar benefits and reduce pelvic pain and other symptoms.


Seek Medical Guidance


Treatment Can Be Tailored

If home remedies and other interventions are not enough to control your symptoms, it is time to visit the doctor. Your physician can check your hormone levels and may prescribe birth control pills or other medications to treat dysmenorrhea. Let your doctor know about your symptoms, especially how they contribute to sleep loss or interfere with daily functioning. Having a complete picture about your medical history will help your doctor come up with the best treatment for you. Getting a yearly health check up is a good idea for everyone.

Birth Control Pills

Some doctors may prescribe hormonal birth control pills or patches for women who suffer from painful menstrual cramps. The medication may help regulate the menstrual cycle and reduce pain. Hormonal birth control helps guard against pregnancy and may help ailments associated with the uterus like endometriosis, if present. Endometriosis and other disorders associated with a woman's reproductive organs may cause secondary dysmenorrhea. This type tends to start earlier during the monthly cycle and lasts longer than typical cramps. Make sure your doctor knows your entire health history and about all of your medical conditions because the pill may not be appropriate for every woman. This type of birth control prevents ovulation. It also prevents the lining of the uterus to become as thick as it normally would during normal monthly hormonal fluctuations. Many women who are on the pill don't experience menstrual bleeding or periods that are much lighter than usual.

Subscribe to this Blog via Email :
Previous
Next Post »